Articles

Key Concepts For Managing Irritable Bowel Syndrome Naturally

Posted by on Feb 6, 2014 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Key Concepts For Managing Irritable Bowel Syndrome Naturally

Irritable Bowel syndrome (IBS) is a condition of abnormal bowel function in the absence of any structural issues. IBS is not a life-threatening condition however it is a long term condition that can cause a great deal of distress and discomfort to the sufferer. It is estimated that up to 20% of the Australian and New Zealand population experience IBS. The most common symptoms of IBS are constipation or diarrhoea (often both are experienced interchangeably), abdominal pain, bloating, excessive and smelly flatulence and a sensation of incomplete evacuation. Other symptoms may include things like nausea, fatigue, indigestion and reflux. There are several factors that need to be considered when addressing irritable bowel symptoms. Some of these factors may be more important than others depending on the individual’s presentation. The good news is that there are many safe and effective strategies that can address these aspects of the syndrome to help alleviate or manage symptoms successfully. Below are some of the key areas of importance; Diet – Food sensitivities can either cause or aggravate IBS symptoms. Food sensitivities can be caused by an immune response to proteins in foods. This immune reaction can be tested for in the blood or alternatively determined through a well-designed elimination and re-challenge diet. Another type of food reaction which has drawn a great deal of attention in relation to IBS is a reaction that occurs in some people to specific types of poorly digested and absorbed carbohydrates. These carbohydrates are not broken down and absorbed within the gut, but instead fermented by bacteria in the small intestine producing symptoms of gas, bloating, pain & diarrhoea. Determining if these specific carbohydrates are a problem relies on an elimination and re-challenge process. This diet is often referred to as the FODMAPS diet. FODMAPS is an acronym for Fermentable Oligo-, Di and Monosaccharides and Polyols. Other common intolerances include foods high in naturally occurring chemicals such as Salicylates, Amines & glutamates, and additives used in foods. Other foods may aggravate symptoms due to their ability to stimulate hypersensitive nerves along the intestinal tract of the IBS sufferers. Dysbiosis – Dysbiosis means an imbalance or disruption in the normal bacteria that reside in the human gut. The microflora of the gut has a huge role to play in regulating digestive health. A disruption in the normal digestive flora has been commonly found in people suffering IBS and in some cases the onset of symptoms can be triggered by gut infection. Improving the intestinal environment to promote healthy gut flora is an effective strategy in managing symptoms. Using foods and carefully selected strains of pro-biotic supplements can help to restore bacterial balance in the digestive system and reduce symptoms. Not all strains of probiotics are equal in their quality, dose and therapeutic benefit. This is why it is important to choose quality products specific for your needs. Check out our blog post on Probiotics for more information. Inflammation –While routine colonic biopsies generally do not identify inflammation, some sufferers have higher than normal levels of inflammatory markers suggesting the occurrence of low grade inflammation. An anti-inflammatory diet is very important here, removing foods that are considered inflammatory and using beneficial foods as medicine to help soothe the gut. There are some fantastic herbal medicines that have been shown to reduce inflammation. Most commonly used in IBS are Slippery Elm, Boswellia, Turmeric, Licorice, Aloe Vera and Ginger . Nervous system support – One of the features of IBS is a hyper-reactive nervous system in response to normal stimuli. This hypersensitivity within the gut may be responsible for much of the...

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Fighting Fatigue Effectively

Posted by on Nov 5, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Fighting Fatigue Effectively

Are you tired all the time, waking unrefreshed and left wondering where your zest for life has gone? Ongoing, unrelenting fatigue has become a problem for many Australians. Fatigue can vary greatly in severity from being mildly uncomfortable to heavily impacting on daily activities in chronic cases. Thankfully there are a number of ways that natural medicines and diet and lifestyle improvement, can assist with building up those energy stores once again. So how is energy produced? The body produces energy within the mitochondria. Mitochondria are small components that exist within each of our body cells. Like little batteries, they are responsible for producing power (energy) required for our bodies to function at every level. Even in healthy people, these powerhouses can’t produce energy of their own accord but require ‘fuel’ or nutrients from our diet to make energy. Energy production will not happen optimally without enough of the right nutrients. A consistent supply of Magnesium, B group vitamins, Co enzyme Q10, iron, Lipoic acid and amino acids, plus more, are all important for optimal energy production. Getting enough of these required nutrients through your diet is a first step to alleviating fatigue & tiredness. And making sure you are absorbing them is just as important! Unfortunately many people do not get their recommended daily intake of many of these nutrients and may even have a greater demand for them because of malabsorption, poor diet, medications, alcohol, stress, genetic factors, infection or other imbalances within their body. There are many reasons why we might be experiencing fatigue. For some, fatigue may be stemming from a deeper imbalance within the body such as infections, stress, unstable blood sugars, toxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, hormone imbalances, Thyroid dysfunction, low iron and other nutritional deficiencies. There is often more than one cause which is why a thorough health assessment is important. All these areas need to be addressed specifically according to the individual. This is where your Naturopath will be able to help you greatly by offering you strategies and effective Herbal and nutritional medicines to help you get your energy back by addressing the cause of fatigue. Here are some foundational tips that everyone can benefit from to boost their energy levels  Eat a fresh, well balanced diet with protein at each meal and plenty of vegetables and do not skip meals.  Make sure you are drinking plenty of water to stay well hydrated  Avoid stimulants such as sugar, coffee, chocolate and refined carbohydrates. These might give a burst of so called ‘energy’ but can wreak havoc on your sugar levels and exhaust you if used regularly  Get regular exercise that is within your limits (especially if fatigue is chronic)  Get some fresh air and sunshine every day.  Increase your anti-oxidant intake. Include superfoods such as Acai berries, Spirulina, Blueberries & Goji berries  Do a gentle detox (best done with the guidance of a practitioner to make sure it is done safely and effectively)  Have relaxation time every day and try to get a minimum of 8 hours sleep  Where possible reduce stress in your life and investigate techniques for managing stress more effectively  Avoid your exposure to chemicals as much as possible. Be aware of the ingredients contained within your cosmetics, body care products and cleaning products and start moving toward gentler products with more friendly ingredients. Being tired all the time can severely affect your quality of life and prevent you from doing many of the things you love. See us today to find out how we can help you bounce back into life! About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is...

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The benefits and uses of Probiotics

Posted by on Oct 12, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

The benefits and uses of Probiotics

A’probiotic’ is a live bacterial dietary supplement which provides benefits to the human host by improving microbial balance in the digestive tract.  There has been extensive research in recent times on the function of our naturally occurring intestinal microflora and the use of probiotics in a wide range of conditions. This research has continued to enlighten us on the role that bacteria play in the healthy functioning of our bodies.  It has been found that there are many conditions which are associated with a disruption of the natural balance of our intestinal bugs and has demonstrated effective use of probiotics to reduce symptoms and improve health. Did you know that, according to the National Institute of Health, of all the cells making up your body, only about 10% of them are actually of human origin? The rest are a colourful array of our microscopic friends! Our beneficial bacteria are crucial to human survival and as you can imagine these highly influential little critters can create significant disturbances if not kept in the right balance. What causes disruption to this delicate balance of intestinal microbes? Stress Poor food choices Overconsumption of alcohol Smoking Medications Overuse of soaps and anti-bacterial gels Radiation Constipation  So what exactly are the functions of a healthy microflora? They regulate the pH of the gut and the skin They are involved in regulating the immune system They synthesise vitamins They assist with crowding out potentially pathogenic bacteria, preventing infection They help to reduce inflammation They have some anticancer properties What conditions or symptoms might they be able to assist with? General bloating and digestive discomfort Diarrhoea, including traveller’s diarrhoea and diarrhoea caused by anti-biotic treatment Constipation Reflux & indigestion Recurrent infections or low immunity Prevention and treatment of eczema Irritable Bowel syndrome Cancer prevention High Cholesterol Auto-immune conditions Allergies Does the strain of bacteria matter? The short answer to this question is yes!  There are many different species and strains of bacteria and as research continues, it is becoming more and more apparent that the strain of the bug, not only the species, matters.  The species of bacteria is like a family with each family member being a different strain.  Each member of a family are closely related and similar in many ways yet each individual exhibits their own unique characteristics.  So it is with strains of probiotics.  One strain may be useful in one area while having no effect in another.  It’s for this reason that choosing the right probiotic food or supplement is important if wanting to elicit a specific therapeutic effect. About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                                  MAKE AN...

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Hayfever: Are you ready for spring?

Posted by on Aug 29, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Hayfever: Are you ready for spring?

Most of us are looking forward to the sunshine and warmer weather of spring, but many are awaiting the onslaught of the dreaded Hay Fever season. Seasonal allergies can vary from annoying sniffles to seriously interfering with everyday life. The good news is that there is a lot that nutrition and herbal medicine can offer to reduce symptoms and address the cause of allergies. Eating a balanced diet rich in omega 3 and fresh fruit and vegetables, drinking plenty of water and getting adequate sunshine to support vitamin D levels are good foundational strategies to start with.  Avoiding the allergen as best as possible is also critical, of course. Some medicinal herbs that may help with Hay Fever and sinusitis can be easily utilised by adding them as a regular part of your diet. Ginger and Fenugreek tea can be drunk twice a day and garlic and horseradish can be added to meals. Follow the link to our delicious Tuna tabouli recipe to help you get your serve of garlic. Nutrients such as vitamin C, Quercetin and zinc can offer some relief by supporting the immune system and reducing inflammation.  There are also a number of herbs that have been shown to help reduce mucous production and sinus pain through various actions. Don’t suffer this spring! Start putting up your defences now and have a fantastic spring!   About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                                         MAKE AN...

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Benefits of Ginger

Posted by on Aug 22, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Benefits of Ginger

Ginger is a fantastic spice that is easily incorporated into the daily diet. As well as adding a beautiful fragrant aroma to curries and stir-fries, it has many therapeutic properties.  Not only can Ginger be used as an ingredient in cooking it can also be made up as a tea using the dry herb or the fresh grated root. Tablet and capsule forms can be found when higher doses are required for therapeutic effect. Below are some of the things that Ginger can be used for. Nausea – Ginger helps to reduce vomiting and nausea, including motion sickness and morning sickness during pregnancy. Digestive aid – Ginger can assist with improving digestive discomfort by increasing saliva and bile flow to help with the digestion of food. Gastric Ulcers – Ginger has some anti-ulcer activity and may inhibit Helicobacter Pylori, a bacteria associated with gastric ulcers. Muscle and joint pain – Ginger can be used to help reduce inflammation and pain. Internal and topical preparations can be used. A concentrated ginger tea swilled or held in the mouth can be used for a toothache. High cholesterol – Ginger helps to lower LDL “bad” cholesterol Anti-oxidant – It helps decrease free-radical activity and amps up our body’s production of it’s own anti-oxidant compounds. Parasites and infections – Ginger has anti-microbial & anti-parasitic properties.   This information is for educational purposes only. As always if using herbs therapeutically be sure to check with your practitioner to make sure it is suitable for you. About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                                 MAKE AN...

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Lifestyle Tips for Weight Management

Posted by on Aug 21, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Lifestyle Tips for Weight Management

Weight management is not only about what you eat and how much you eat. It is also about how you eat and your lifestyle habits. Here is a list of suggestions that can help you not just to achieve weight Loss, but also maintain a healthy weight long term. Of course this is a long list and not all of these tips will apply to everyone, but it is a good exercise to highlight the points that are most useful for you and set about implementing them one by one. Include regular relaxation activities in your life and take the time to learn some   techniques that may help you in coping with daily stress. Counselling is a helpful tool if there are emotional or psychological blocks stopping you reaching your weight loss goal and maintaining it. Quality sleep has been shown to be very important in weight management.  Try to have a regular sleep pattern and get 8 hours a night.  Research shows sleep quality is best between 10 pm and 2 am at night. Find exercise regimes that you enjoy, it will help keep you motivated. Find friends or family who can encourage you and help keep you motivated to reach your goals. Exercising with other people whether it is in a class, with a personal trainer or with a friend. This helps keep you accountable and often makes the time pass quicker. Setting goals is important.  Make your goals achievable and set realistic time frames to reach those goals.  Celebrate goals achieved no matter how small and then set a new goal. Eliminate “white” foods eg white bread, white pasta, white rice, pastries, potatoes and white flour. Reduce or eliminate wheat intake as it can impede weight loss for some people. Avoid using commercial cereals which are often laden with sugar and are overly processed. Make your own pasta and stir-fry sauces as much as possible.  Most bought sauces and marinades are full of sugar and salt. When dining out choose healthier options and cuisines.  Avoid buffet restaurants and skip the garlic bread.  Sushimi, Thai foods, salads without cream dressing, baked chicken dishes and fish dishes are all good options. Enjoy a glass of wine or champagne only socially and decide before you go out how many drinks you will have and what you will have.  If you find this hard, leave your card at home and only take enough cash to cover what you have decided to consume. Don’t add sugar to things or consume foods high in sugar eg lollies, chocolate bars, cakes, biscuits, muesli bars, soft drinks and sports drink. Avoid artificial sweeteners as the effects on the body may be toxic and detrimental to weight loss in large doses.  Stevia and xylitol are two natural alternatives as sweeteners that are safe and have a very low glycaemic index. When eating meat or chicken be aware of portion size.  1 serving should be no larger than the width and circumference of the palm of your hand. Be wary of “low fat” products as they are often full of sugar to compensate for the removed fat. Keep your favourite healthy meal ideas and recipes on hand for last minute meals. Keep a few healthy meals in the freezer to avoid getting takeaway. Snack on fresh fruit and veg or enjoy a herbal tea or soda water with lemon instead of a snack. Adequate water consumption is important.  Usually between 1.5L – 2.5L per day. Try to include good quality protein with each meal eg tuna, fish, egg, lean chicken, lean meat, nuts and seeds, lentils,...

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