Articles

Should you be eating organic?

Posted by on Sep 8, 2014 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Should you be eating organic?

    There has been much debate over the years as to whether organic produce is really any better for you than conventional. To weigh this up, there are a couple of points to consider.     #1. Is organic fruit and veg more nutritious? Organic fruit and veg appear to contain similar vitamin and mineral content as conventional, varying slightly depending on farming methods and where it is grown. The difference in Phytochemicals, including many important anti-oxidants is where the difference lies. Higher concentrations are found in organic produce offering greater protection on our health. #2. What about the chemicals? This is a very important and significant difference when deciding to eat more organically. The level of chemical toxins we are exposed to in modern life is horrifying. Frequent intake of pesticides makes extra work for our body and increase our need for many different nutrients. Some common pesticides used have been shown to disrupt hormone balance and Thyroid health. Eating 100% organic is not always an option for some due to availability or cost. However, even partial intake of organic foods can help reduce the toxic load on your body and boost your anti-oxidant status. Take a look at the environmental working groups dirty dozen to see which fruit and vegetables are sprayed the most and try to choose organic versions of these where possible. Growing your own fruit, veg and herbs is another way to help with organic eating. At least you can control what types of product and how much you use. There are some people for whom eating organically may be particularly helpful. Below I have listed some instances where the importance of organic eating is more significant. Please note this is not a complete list. People suffering Thyroid Disorders Conditions or symptoms indicating Hormone imbalances Infancy and Childhood Pregnant and lactating women Men and women planning for a baby or struggling to conceive Those with Auto-immune or Neurological conditions My advice… Eat organically where and when possible including meat and dairy products but keep in mind that it is still better to eat conventional fruit and vegetables than to not eat fruit and vegetables at all!   About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500.   REQUEST AND APPOINTMENT                            MAKE AN...

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Top 5 Must Dos for Boosting immunity

Posted by on Jul 3, 2014 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Top 5 Must Dos for Boosting immunity

It’s well and truly cold and flu season and not many of us will escape free from one of the many winter bugs going around. But, did you know that there are several simple steps that you can take to boost your immunity? Take note of the following tips and reduce your risk of being knocked flat by another nasty virus this season.   Below are my top 5 must dos for building your resilience this winter. 1. Get adequate sleep Sleep is vital for a robust defence system. While you sleep your body is busy producing chemicals that are involved in warding off infections. Sleep deprivation, aside from it’s other detrimental effects, will increase the chance of picking up a cold or flu and will most likely slow your recovery. 2. Moderate exercise While over-exercising may not be the best for our immunity, regular moderate exercise has been shown to aid in fighting off bugs and viruses. Do your best to keep moving despite the wintry weather. 3. Consume a whole food diet A whole food diet includes foods that are as close to their natural state as possible. These types of foods tend to be rich in nutrients and anti-oxidants which are required for optimal immune function. Make sure you include regular protein (fish, legumes, meat, chicken, eggs, nuts and seeds) along with plenty of colourful fresh vegetables. 4. Manage stress Stress, especially if persistent, is known to have a detrimental effect on our immune state. Avoiding stress is not always possible, however managing stress through relaxation techniques, rest, laughter and self-care are all important strategies for reducing the impact of stress on your immune system. 5. Avoid sugars and processed foods Diets high in refined sugar suppress the immune system by impairing function of the immune cells. As well as this a processed and high sugar diet is deplete in nutrients required for a good defence system and crowds out space where other nutrient dense foods should be.  Still getting sick?…. Some of you may find that despite implementing the above strategies you are still prone to frequent or lingering infections. Nutritional deficiencies, severe, long-term stress, food sensitivities, hormone imbalances and pre-existing conditions might be contributing to low immune function. In this case further assessment and support using herbal and nutritional medicines may be useful for both preventing illness and assisting recovery. If this sounds like you click on the link below to request an appointment today. We’d love to help you!:-)   About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                            MAKE AN...

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What is a Naturopath and why would I see one?

Posted by on May 19, 2014 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

What is a Naturopath and why would I see one?

I can’t even count the amount of times I’ve been at a party, my child’s playgroup or a friend’s wedding and the inevitable question comes… “so, what do you do?” The most common response I seem to get is a blank look and a vague …”ok”, quickly followed by a change of subject. Of course this isn’t always the case, but often it is as many people don’t really know what a Naturopath does and seem too afraid to ask, so I thought it was about time that I wrote something to explain exactly what I do.   First things first….a little introduction to Naturopathy. The term Naturopathy is relatively new. It was coined in the late 1800’s as a term to describe a system of medicine that followed the philosophies below. These philosophies were based on the principles and philosophies of Hippocrates, the Greek physician who has incurred the title of ‘The father of Medicine’. A Naturopath is someone who practices this system of medicine. Naturopathy is considered a Complementary medicine, meaning that it works side by side with conventional medicine. Modern Naturopaths undergo extensive training in health sciences as well as both scientific and traditional understandings of Nutrition and plant medicines (Herbal medicines). A Naturopath who has undergone appropriate training through an accredited college or University should be registered with an industry governing body. This is important to make sure that your practitioner is appropriately trained to advise you on your health needs. Naturopathy incorporates Nutrition, Lifestyle Counselling and Herbal Medicine based on thorough health assessments. It may also include other modalities such as Massage, Homoepathy or Counselling for those with specialist training in these areas.   Every Naturopath may work slightly differently but the foundation for every Naturopathic treatment is based around the following philosophies…. The Healing power of Nature The body knows how to heal, it just needs the right environment and resources to support those inbuilt healing processes. The aim of the Naturopath is to provide the body with everything it needs to return to balance. Identify and treat the causes There are times when relief of symptoms is required however our main aim is to get to the root cause of the problem so that symptoms can be alleviated for good where possible. First Do no Harm Naturopaths, like all health care professionals, have a duty of care to their patients to only use medicines and therapies that are non-toxic and beneficial to the client. Naturopaths aim to use medicines and therapies that are as gentle and close to nature as possible. This means starting with dietary and lifestyle changes and using herbs and nutrients as indicated for extra support. More aggressive therapies are considered a last resort. Important note: this is not to imply that all nutritional and herbal supplements are completely safe for everyone at every time. It is important to seek guidance on natural products from a trained professional to check on interactions, dosage, quality of product etc. in order to ensure safety and benefit. Naturopath as teacher Part of a Naturopaths role is to empower people to take responsibility for their own health. Ultimately our aim is to educate our clients to know their bodies better and feel confident in making choices for their well-being. Treat the whole person A Naturopath takes a holistic approach to a person’s health. Addressing all areas of health and life is important for achieving the best results. We understand that every body part and system doesn’t work in isolation but effects many other areas of the body. We also recognise that there are...

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Iodine Deficiency and the link with Thyroid, Brain and Breast Health

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Iodine Deficiency and the link with Thyroid, Brain and Breast Health

What is Iodine Iodine is a trace mineral essential to many aspects of our health. Iodine deficiency has been on the increase in Australia and is now considered by some experts to be epidemic.   Iodine and the Thyroid Iodine is primarily thought of in relation to Thyroid health as it is a necessary component of Thyroid hormone. Iodine molecules bind together with Tyrosine, an amino acid derived from the breakdown of protein, to form Thyroid hormone which has an exceptionally important role in the body. The thyroid gland is a small butterfly shaped gland that sits at the base of the throat. It secretes hormones that regulate many biological and metabolic processes, growth, development and energy expenditure. It is estimated that 1 in 7 Australians will be affected by some form of thyroid disorder during their lifetime. An underactive Thyroid, or hypothyroidism, is generally more common however both hypo and hyper thyroid disorders are serious conditions that need attending to. Because Iodine plays such a crucial role in maintaining optimal Thyroid function, symptoms of Iodine deficiency tend to line up with symptoms of Thyroid Disorders. See table below. Iodine isn’t the only nutrient implicated in a healthy functioning Thyroid gland. Other nutrients such as Selenium, Tyrosine and Zinc are also required for healthy Thyroid function. Iodine supplementation should not be attempted without first talking to your doctor if you already have a Thyroid condition.   Symptoms of Thyroid Dysfunction Hypothyroidism (underactive) Hyperthyroidism (overactive) Fatigue Accelerated heart rate/Heart palpitations Slow heart rate Unexplained weight loss Weight gain or inability to lose weight Muscle trembling & weakness Intolerance to cold Bulging eyes Hair loss Irritability/anxiety Goitre Intolerance to heat/sweating Aching muscles Insomnia Puffy face Diarrhoea Depression Irregular, light menstrual cycle Poor concentration   Constipation   Heavy menstrual flow   Dry skin     Iodine and Brain Development As well as its role in Thyroid health, Iodine is also required for proper foetal development and growth and maturation in children and adolescents. According to the World Health Organisation, Iodine deficiency is worldwide, the leading cause of preventable intellectual disability. It is for this reason that pregnant and breastfeeding women need to ensure adequate intake of Iodine either from foods or a good quality multi-vitamin. There has been some research into a link between ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and low Iodine status in the mothers of children diagnosed with ADHD. Further investigation is needed to confirm this connection.   Iodine and the breast The breast tissue contains high concentrations of Iodine and deficiency has been linked with conditions of the breast including fibrocystic breast Disease and breast cancer. There is some evidence that Iodine may have a protective role in the development of breast cancer. Iodine’s anti-oxidant capacity may be responsible for some of this action. Japanese women have a very low rate of breast cancer and some experts attribute this to the Japanese diet being rich Iodine. Iodine has also been used effectively to reduce mastalgia (painful breasts) and the development of fibrocystic breasts.   Causes of Iodine Deficiency It has been suggested that our diets no longer provide sufficient Iodine due to a number of factors including depleting soil levels, low intake of seafood, a push to reduce salt intake and changes in sanitisation practices in dairy processing. Up until the 1990’s dairy processing plants in Australia used Iodine based sanitation and it was for this reason that dairy was once considered a good source of Iodine.  This is no longer the case since the switch from Iodine based sanitisation to chlorine based products.   Foods and Iodine There are some...

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Magnesium: Are you missing this mighty mineral?

Posted by on Apr 2, 2014 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Magnesium: Are you missing this mighty mineral?

Magnesium is one of the most abundant minerals in the human body and is involved in over 300 different physiological pathways! Because it is being constantly used up it is important to be replenishing our stocks daily.  Having optimal levels of this fantastic mineral is absolutely crucial to having great health. Unfortunately the western lifestyle doesn’t do a whole lot for our Magnesium status. The National dietary Survey of Adults conducted in 1983 indicated that up to 48% of men and 59% of women consumed less than the recommended daily intake of 350mg per day of Magnesium.   So, why aren’t we getting all the Magnesium that we need? Below are some of the major factors that quickly deplete our Magnesium levels. Stress Food processing Excessive alcohol consumption Loss through cooking Inhibited absorption due to poor intestinal health Inhibited absorption due to naturally occurring chemicals such as phytic acid and Oxalic acid Refined diets high in fats and sugars Some prescription medications (including the contraceptive pill, HRT, Corticosteroids and some blood pressure medications, amongst others.)   Some of the most common symptoms of Magnesium deficiency are …. Muscle cramps Restless legs Tics & twitches Irritability & anxiety Fatigue Poor exercise recovery Irregular heartbeat Blood sugar irregularities   There are some Conditions where supplementation and/or dietary increase in Magnesium may be useful. These include; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia High Blood pressure Insomnia Stress, anxiety and irritability Headaches and migraines Period pain Pregnancy Irritable Bowel Syndrome Muscle cramps and twitches Restless legs syndrome Adrenal fatigue poor muscle recovery after exercise Imbalances in glucose and insulin metabolism Supplementing with Magnesium can be of great benefit to your health, however as with all supplements check first with your Naturopath or Nutritionist to make sure it is safe for you. Not all Magnesium supplements are created equal. There are many different forms which magnesium can be found and not all are easily absorbed by the body. Some forms may also create irritation to the gut when taken in high doses. This is where your practitioner can help you find a product that will give you maximum benefit. Use their wealth of wisdom and get the most nutritional bang for your buck!   Top up your Magnesium tank by enjoying these Magnesium rich foods daily. 🙂 Dark Chocolate/cocoa Pumpkin seeds Green leafy veg Beans and legumes Cashews Quinoa Tahini/sesame seeds Sunflower seeds Figs Molasses Kelp Eggs   Disclaimer: This information is provided for general interest and education only. It is not designed to replace the advice of your doctor or natural therapist. Herbal and nutritional medicines should be prescribed by a health professional trained in these fields to ensure they are both safe and beneficial. About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                                MAKE AN...

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My Top 10, No Fuss, Snacks For Kids!

Posted by on Feb 19, 2014 in Adonai, Articles, Recipes | 0 comments

My Top 10, No Fuss, Snacks For Kids!

Helping your kids to eat a nutritious diet at a young age is important to make sure they have all the building blocks they need to grow, and grow well. Not only this but when kids learn to eat a variety of healthy food at a young age it sets them up for healthy food habits as adults.   Unfortunately, as Mum’s and Dad’s it can become difficult in the midst of all the other parenting duties to provide healthy options to our constantly ‘starving’ children! Here are my top 10 ideas for no fuss, quick and easy snacks for kids.   1. Fresh fruit So this may seem like an obvious one, but it had to be my number one since it is so quick , versatile and easy to be creative with. Organic is best to reduce kid’s exposure to pesticides, but buying local and in season is the next best thing if organic is not available.   2. Natural Yoghurt with sunflower seeds, Pepitas (pumpkin seeds) & frozen berries Any kind of seeds can be added to make a fun texture for kids. Ground nuts and seeds such as LSA mix might be better for really young kids. These ingredients can also be thrown into a blender with some milk of your choice to make a delicious smoothie.   3. mini cucumbers and cherry tomatoes Mini cucumbers are crisp, fresh and can be a great snack that kids can grab from the fridge in seconds. They are great for snacks on the run and a good way to get another serve of veg into them. Throw a chunk of capsicum and a few cherry toms in for good measure.   4. Veggie fritters Okay, so this one does take some preparation, but if you make a whole batch you’ll have them for several days. Grate up your favourite vegetables (about 4 cups) and combine with 2 eggs, ½ cup of olive oil and 1 cup of SR flour and place in a sandwhich toastie maker until firm & golden brown. You can use gluten free SR flour if your child has diet restrictions. Veggies I use are sweet potato, onion, celery, carrot, capsicum and zucchini. To save on time I use a grater blade in my food processor to grate the veg.   5. Celery with cottage cheese, chia seeds and paprika They can dip the celery into the cottage cheese or mix a small spoon of chia seeds into cottage cheese and fill the celery stalk, topping with paprika. Can’t have dairy? Try some hummus (see recipe), almond paste or fresh (no added sugar & oils) peanut paste. You can find freshly ground peanut paste with no added extras in many Health food shops.   6. Choc yummy balls (see recipe) As with the veggie fritters, these take some preparation (10 mins). Once made however, you have a batch for the week. Although I must admit these never last the week in our house!   7. Boiled egg Eggs are full of protein and good fats necessary for healthy development of the brain and muscles. If boiled, the eggs can be kept in the fridge for a few days ready to grab when the need arises.   8. Rice cake with avocado and tuna Tasty treat, again with great protein and fats for children’s development.   9. Banana and chia seed cupcakes (see recipe) I love these cupcakes. They are so easy and require very little sugar due to the sweetness of the banana. They are more satisfying and nutritious due to the higher protein...

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