Posts made in August, 2013

Calcium: It’s not just about Dairy

Posted by on Aug 17, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 0 comments

Calcium: It’s not just about Dairy

Many people are concerned about how reducing their dairy intake will affect their Calcium levels. We have been bomb-barded with information over the last decade about the importance of calcium for bone health and you would be forgiven for thinking that dairy products were the only source of calcium as they are the main focus when it comes to dietary dairy sources. Well dairy is not the only source of Calcium and certainly in some cases it may not be the best source of calcium. Great news for those who don’t tolerate dairy! Dairy foods have been picked out because they do contain high levels of Calcium but we need to also consider how much of that calcium is being absorbed. Dairy also contain high levels of other naturally occurring chemicals which prevent our body from fully utilizing that Calcium. There are other foods which at first glance may seem less superior to dairy in the Calcium stakes, but are in fact more useful sources because they are better absorbed. Below is a list of non-dairy foods that are good calcium sources. Calcium value is per 100g of food. Sardines (with the bones) 550mg Linseeds 271mg Almonds (& almond butter) 250mg Eggs (chicken – more for duck eggs) 56mg Sesame seeds (& tahini – unhulled) 1160mg Dried figs 260mg Cabbage 77mg Lemons 110mg Stewed Rhubarb 93mg Chia seeds 631mg Tofu 170mg Brazil nuts 180mg Parsley 260 Broccoli 125mg Carob powder 355mg Kelp 1095mg Watercress 190mg Spring onions (& other onion varieties) 140mg Navy Beans 95mg Chickpeas 70mg It’s important to remember that when it comes to bone health Calcium is not the only factor. Resistance exercise, adequate sunshine for vitamin D synthesis and other trace minerals are all important things to consider for maintaining good bone density. Calcium supplements may be useful in some circumstances. Not all calcium supplements are created equal though, and unfortunately there are many poor quality calcium supplements out there. It is best to talk to your Nutritionist/Naturopath about which supplement is best for you and what dose you should be taking. There is no point wasting money on supplements you won’t absorb! About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                            MAKE AN...

Read More

Healthy Breakfast Ideas

Posted by on Aug 15, 2013 in Adonai, Articles, Recipes | 0 comments

Healthy Breakfast Ideas

When I talk to clients about making dietary changes to benefit their health, breakfast seems to be the meal that people struggle with the most. We have become so accustomed to our cereal and toast, that to think of any other option becomes quite overwhelming for many. So here is a list of breakfast options that might help you make healthier choices for the most important meal of the day. • Home-made baked beans on spelt toast & a fresh vegetable juice (A batch of baked beans can be made on the weekend or the night before to save precious time in the morning) • Poached eggs with a slice of smoked salmon and a handful of chopped fresh fruit. • Scrambled eggs or an omelette with tomato, red onion, fetta and fresh basil • Ryvitas or rice cakes with avocado, cottage cheese and sprouts • Ryvitas or rice cakes with ABC spread (almond, Brazil & Cashew nuts) & a scrape of raw honey. • Yoghurt (be careful of sugar and additives in commercial yoghurts) with a handful of mixed berries and mix of sunflower, pumpkin (Pepitas) & Chia seeds • Buckwheat pancakes (buckwheat flour, baking powder, egg & milk of choice) with natural yoghurt, sliced strawberries & a drizzle of pure maple syrup or raw honey. • Sautéed asparagus and/or mushrooms with garlic on quinoa • Choc, almond & banana smoothie • Smoothies using almond, soy, rice or oat milk and your favourite fruit. You can include other ingredients such as natural yoghurt, nut pastes, LSA, Chia seeds, sunflower seeds,, soaked almonds, protein powder, bananas, frozen or fresh berries, kiwifruit, cocoa powder, oats, quinoa flakes. • Frittata and some fresh fruit. • Stewed fruit with yoghurt and LSA • Quinoa cooked with grated apple, cinnamon & a dollop of ricotta • Quinoa and amaranth porridge with chopped almonds cinnamon and blueberries Two more things…. Don’ forget there is no rule that says you can’t eat leftovers for breakfast! Sometimes a warm soup or last nights curry is just what the doctor ordered for a satisfying breakfast on a cold winter’s morning. Almost every other non-western culture gets one of their serves of vegetables at breakfast time. If you are struggling to get your 5 serves of veg everyday, try finding ways to include them with you breakfast. Some of the ideas above might be useful.:-) About the author: Kelli Kieselbach is the Naturopath and owner at Adonai Natural Health Clinic in the North East suburbs of Adelaide, SA. Kelli is passionate about restoring health and preventing disease using nutrition and herbal medicines. As a Naturopath, Kelli uses her skills clinically to empower clients of all ages to achieve better health and quality of life. To request an appointment with Kelli or to make an enquiry, please click on the links below or contact the clinic on 08 8396 7500. REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT                                    MAKE AN...

Read More

Interview with Naked Naturopath

Posted by on Aug 10, 2013 in Adonai, Articles, News | 0 comments

Interview with Naked Naturopath

PRACTITIONERS WE LIKE   Meet Kelli Kieselbach (Naturopath), Adonai Natural Health, St Agnes, SA.  Kelli is a Qualified Naturopath & Nutritionist who has a special interest in Mood & Stress, Fatigue and Digestive Complaints.   Q. Why did you choose a profession in naturopathy? I wanted to be able to support people on their journey to health in a way that was holistic, dealing with the causes and respecting the individual person. I discovered Naturopathy through my own health challenges and it offered all of these things and was remarkably effective in many areas. My discovery of natural therapies empowered me and offered hope which was not something I experienced through orthodox medicine. The integration of a holistic philosophy and effective treatments fit perfectly with what I wanted to do. Q. What special area of complementary medicine gets you excited? I am really interested in the role of nutrition and herbal medicines in supporting mood. With depression, anxiety and stress destroying the quality of life of so many sufferers it is really exciting to see how Naturopathy can significantly improve these conditions with safe and often simple remedies. Q. Briefly, tell me about an exceptional result you were able to achieve with a client? I saw a lady who was trying to lose weight, but had plateaued and just couldn’t lose any more. We identified some gut issues and a sluggish liver. I put her on a weight loss meal plan and gave her a probiotic and herbal supplement to support her liver function. On her 2nd visit, a week later she had already lost 2kg and was feeling great, with more energy and her bloating had improved 80%. I saw her regularly for the next 4 months and in that time her bloating completely disappeared, her energy continued to improve and she lost a total of 13kg. Q. If I was looking to take a much needed health break to regenerate and start fresh, where would you recommend I go? I always choose the beach for a re-energising get away.  Preferably a beach some  distance from the city. I love the Yorke Peninsula. Q. What is the book you most recommend to clients to read? Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food: An eater’s manifesto. It gives a fantastic history of how the western diet became what it is today and inspires us to get back to eating real food. Q. What are your top 3 tips to obtain better health? – Get adequate rest – Don’t work late at night & get to bed by 10pm – Stay active – Exercise outside and get some fresh air & vitamin D at the same time – Eat fresh food – Make the majority of what you eat packet free;-) Now, about you? Q. What would you eat in a normal day? Breakfast always involves fresh fruit and either yoghurt with berries, pepitas, sunflower seeds and chia seeds, or an omelette or poached egg with veggies. Lunch; a salad with tuna in summer and often leftovers in winter. Dinner varies a lot because I get bored easily, but there’s always lots of veggies or salads with a rotation of fish, legumes, red meat and occasionally chicken. I do like the odd snack. Nuts, fresh fruit, homemade protein balls or hummus & veg sticks are my usuals. Q. Do you have any weaknesses in the food department? I love Dark chocolate and good quality cheese.:-) Q. What are you reading at the moment? The majority of my reading is the latest news in health and complementary medicine. Q. What would you most like to see happen...

Read More

Tips for better sleep

Posted by on Aug 10, 2013 in Adonai, Articles | 2 comments

Tips for better sleep

Good quality sleep is essential for maintaining wellness. Sleep is required for hormone production and allows the body to repair itself. The consequences of lack of sleep or poor quality sleep can have profound effects on every aspect of our lives; health, emotions, mental state, relationships and work. Some consequences of sleep deprivation are depression, anxiety, reproductive disorders, poor cognition, fatigue, obesity, low sex drive, slow reaction time…the list could go on. Most people require an average of 8 hours sleep. Some people while they may achieve this might experience broken sleep or find they do not get the depth of sleep they should. Our modern lifestyle is not conducive to good sleep patterns which can make ongoing quality sleep an issue for many. There are many reasons why people may not sleep well but here are some simple tips to start you on your journey to better sleep and better health! –        Avoid artificial light from TV, computer & smart phone screens late at night. These types of light are known to reduce melatonin (our sleep inducing hormone) levels. –        Eat good quality protein throughout the day including the evening meal. Of particular importance are foods high in Tryptophan such as Bananas, nut pastes, chicken or cheese. Tryptophan is an amino acid from protein which is required for melatonin production. –        Do something that relaxes you and helps you wind down for 30 minutes before bed. Reading, quiet music, prayer, bath or audio books are common examples. –        Avoid coffee, sugar & alcohol, especially in the evenings. These things have been shown to reduce the quality of sleep. –        Try to get to bed by 10pm most nights.  Getting sleep between the hours of 10pm and 2am are the most important for body repair and hormone production. –        Get regular exercise, but avoid exercising at night. –        Enjoy relaxing herbal teas in the evening. Blends containing Chamomile, Passionflower and Lemonbalm are great options. –        A little lavender oil on a tissue beside your bed or a dab behind your ears are helpful for some people for inducing relaxation &...

Read More